Page 2 of 2

Posted: Tue Feb 08, 2005 9:23 pm
by willhart
Rumored somewhere (don't remember where) that the G6 would have full POWER4 integration and could run PowerPC and x86 side by side. Can I get a validation on this?

Posted: Wed Feb 09, 2005 8:39 am
by PPC_Digger
willhart wrote:Rumored somewhere (don't remember where) that the G6 would have full POWER4 integration and could run PowerPC and x86 side by side. Can I get a validation on this?
I know that the original PowerPC (601 if I am not mistaken) was developed by IBM, Apple and Motorola to run both x86 and 68k apps, while making a new RISC core which would run its own code (native PowerPC code).

Posted: Wed Feb 09, 2005 7:10 pm
by gb
PPC_Digger wrote:I know that the original PowerPC (601 if I am not mistaken) was developed by IBM, Apple and Motorola to run both x86 and 68k apps, while making a new RISC core which would run its own code (native PowerPC code).
The PowerPC 615 was to have an x86 decoder built-in the chip. However, performance didn't match the expectations, IIRC. I can't remember anything like a 68k decoder built-in. Apple/Connectix DR 68k emulators were fast enough and needed to be fully integrated into the system anyway.

Posted: Fri Feb 18, 2005 8:28 am
by robotintestines
It sure would be neat to run Star Trek :(

Posted: Tue Mar 15, 2005 7:17 pm
by CFran2
If hertz are so relative in processors, why don't we use a different system?"
Aint u ever heard of Megaflops?? Apple even used it in ads. i think its the number of operations a second[/quote]

Posted: Fri Mar 18, 2005 12:59 pm
by PPC_Digger
CFran2 wrote:
If hertz are so relative in processors, why don't we use a different system?"
Aint u ever heard of Megaflops?? Apple even used it in ads. i think its the number of operations a second
[/quote]
Megaflops are units used to measure how many Floting-Point operation a CPU does per second. Another example is MIPS, the number (in millions) of instructions per second, however it is less accurate when comparing CPUs as different as Pentium/Athlon and PowerPC, since their instructions are extremely different from each other.