Resize A Disk Partition?

About SheepShaver, a PPC Mac emulator for Windows, MacOS X, and Linux that can run System 7.5.3 to MacOS 9.0.4.

Moderators: Cat_7, Ronald P. Regensburg, ClockWise

Post Reply
egoss
Space Cadet
Posts: 5
Joined: Sun Dec 13, 2009 2:25 pm
Location: The Nutmag State

Resize A Disk Partition?

Post by egoss »

Hi gang -
I am running SheepShaver Version 25-10-2009 on an Early 2009 Mac Mini using Mac OS 10.6.2. It performs wonderfully for me so far, but I now find that I would like to increase the virtual hard disk size. I originally set it to 1000MB, but would like to change it to 3-4 GB. Can I do this by simply changing the preferences, or must I create a new drive?
Thanks for all your work and help.
Ed
User avatar
Cat_7
Expert User
Posts: 5104
Joined: Fri Feb 13, 2004 8:59 am
Location: Sittard, The Netherlands

Post by Cat_7 »

Hi,

You'll have to create a new disk. I would recommend not going above 2 Gb per disk. If needed, you can add more disks. After you created the disk, initialize it in Mac OS and copy your system to it. To boot from the new volume, make sure it is top in the list of volumes in the preferences editor.

Best,
Cat_7
User avatar
Ronald P. Regensburg
Expert User
Posts: 6391
Joined: Thu Feb 09, 2006 10:24 pm
Location: Amsterdam, Netherlands

Post by Ronald P. Regensburg »

If you need more disk space, you can also simply add more volumes in preferences.
egoss
Space Cadet
Posts: 5
Joined: Sun Dec 13, 2009 2:25 pm
Location: The Nutmag State

Post by egoss »

Two possibilities come to mind:

Create a new 1 GB volume - will it show up on my original SS boot volume? That way I could simply store files on it, and keep the apps on the boot volume.

Create a 2GB volume - can I drag my SS boot volume to it and copy it over? Then I could boot from the new volume and erase the original?

I'm just not sure how SS treats this sort of issue.
Thanks again, Ed
User avatar
Ronald P. Regensburg
Expert User
Posts: 6391
Joined: Thu Feb 09, 2006 10:24 pm
Location: Amsterdam, Netherlands

Post by Ronald P. Regensburg »

You can do either.

If you create a second (or third, or fourth, etc.) volume it will be treated by SheepShaver as just another volume. During startup you will be asked to initialize it and it will show up on the desktop below the startup disk. You can save your files to the extra volume or install additional applications on it. It will work exactly as on a real old Mac with more than one disk.

If you decide to copy the content of the first volume onto a second larger volume, you can then startup from that second volume. The old MacOS system could simply be copied from one disk to another. Note that SheepShaver will startup from the first bootable volume in the list, so you will need to remove the first disk from the list (or remove it and add it again as second volume) to startup from the new volume.

The first solution (with extra volumes) would be easiest. Remember that in the old days, it was quite normal to use different disks or different partitions on a Mac, one for the system, one for applications, one for documents.

If you try the second solution, make sure the System Folder of the copied system is "blessed", shows its proper System Folder icon. If it does not, you need to bless the folder by opening and closing the folder. If the icon still does not show, open the folder, drag the Finder and System files out of the folder, close the folder, open again the folder, drag both files back into folder and again close the folder. The folder should now be blessed, show its icon. A System Folder that is does not show its proper icon is not bootable, even though all files are present.
prowler
Tinkerer
Posts: 49
Joined: Thu May 14, 2009 10:53 pm
Location: Sidcup, England

Post by prowler »

Ronald P. Regensburg wrote:Make sure the System Folder of the copied system is "blessed", shows its proper System Folder icon. If it does not, you need to bless the folder by opening and closing the folder. If the icon still does not show, open the folder, drag the Finder and System files out of the folder, close the folder, open again the folder, drag both files back into folder and again close the folder. The folder should now be blessed, show its icon. A System Folder that is does not show its proper icon is not bootable, even though all files are present.
Hi Ronald,
That's the most complete summary of the technique for Blessing the System Folder of a boot drive I have seen. Thanks for sharing that with us here.

On many occasions, I have had to drag the contents of one bootable hard drive or hardfile to a larger one as hard disk space has become cheaper and applications larger. However, I have not yet had a situation in which the destination drive was not then bootable, so I have never actually had to Bless the System Folder myself. I guess I've just been lucky up to now.
Post Reply