Putting Windows Images Into BasiliskII using HSVExplorer?

About BasiliskII, a 68k Mac emulator for Windows, MacOSX, and Linux that can run System 7.x through MacOS 8.1.

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StickyChannel92
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Putting Windows Images Into BasiliskII using HSVExplorer?

Post by StickyChannel92 »

Hey...

I'm new to this site, and I love working with Macintoshes. However, I'm trying to figure out how to put a .png image onto an .hsv disk. When I copied and pasted the file into my disk, it successfully put the file from Windows into Macintosh, but this is where I get stumped. When I try to open it up in the emulator, I can't, because I swear, it must be that the Macintosh uses a different image format than .png images. Any workaround? :???:
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Ronald P. Regensburg
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Re: Putting Windows Images Into BasiliskII using HSVExplorer?

Post by Ronald P. Regensburg »

You do not tell which MacOS version you run in BasiliskII.
.png is a relative new image format (introduced mid nineties), unknown to older QuickTime versions.
Try installing QT 4. You can find it here: https://macintoshgarden.org/apps/quicktime-4
Make sure you install the 68k version.
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adespoton
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Re: Putting Windows Images Into BasiliskII using HSVExplorer?

Post by adespoton »

Originally, Macs supported the PICT format. This is a bitmap format, stored either in the data or resource fork, with a filetype of PICT. Software like GIFView and JPEGView came along to support the GIF and JPEG formats before too long. There was also MacPaint that supported a native format and PICT, and PhotoShop that supported native PSD files and PICT. Then came GraphicConverter that supported pretty much everything available, and was continually updated (through today) so as soon as PNGs were released in the mid 90s, it supported them. QuickTime was a bit slow to add native handling of PNG.
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